Posted in: publication, Publishing, publishing a novel, self-publishing, self-publishing fiction

Self-Publishing for Heroines – Part 2

Self-publishing is a vast subject, but I’ve narrowed down my thoughts to self-publishing for writers of women’s fiction. That’s what I know, and there isn’t a lot written about it.

A big reality about self-publishing experts: they’re mostly advising writers of the bestselling genres: romance, thriller, mystery, and science fiction/fantasy.

If you’re writing women’s fiction and considering self-publishing, this blog series is for you. Self-publishing is a vast subject, but I’ve narrowed down my thoughts to focus on helpful ideas for indie women’s fiction. writers That’s what I know, and there isn’t a lot that focuses on our category

A big reality: most self-publishing experts are advising writers of bestselling genres: romance, thriller, mystery, and science fiction/fantasy. Experts like Mark Dawson and Nick Stephenson focus on these genres, and authors making huge amounts of money as indies are almost invariably in one of these categories.

If you’re writing women’s fiction, and considering self-publishing, this blog series is intended to offer tips and ideas relevant to our category.

Defining Your Goals

Knowing your goal for a book is the key to deciding whether or not to self-publish. Your goal might be: building an audience, or make money, or have your stories told. I used a self-assessment and developed this questionnaire from it.

Self-Publishing Questionnaire

Defining your goals is the key to deciding about self-publishing. Your goals might be: building an audience, making money, having your voice heard, telling the stories only you can tell. I did self-assessment before self-publishing. I asked myself these questions.

Q: Why do you write fiction?

A: I’ve loved stories since I was a child reading the Oz books and Nancy Drew. Even before I became a poet, I tried writing fiction. I’ll do it even if I can’t make much money at it.

Q: In writing fiction, what do you hope to achieve?

A: I once hoped to make a living, but now as an indie author I hope to enlarge my readership to eventually have thousands of readers.

Q: Do you miss having an agent as a writing life partner?

A: I do, but I never found an agent I’d like to hire as my partner. I’ve worked with two, and neither fit my long-term goals or the stories I want to write.

Q: If you self-publish women’s fiction, and not the bestselling categories (romance, thriller, mystery) won’t it be hard to find your audience?

A: Genres were invented by publishers and agents. I’d rather have readers—even fewer readers—who aren’t looking for those formulas.

Q: What skills do you bring to the business of self-publishing?

A: My day job is in marketing. I write direct mail copy and newsletters. And I love technology. I’m willing to learn the mechanics of advertising online with Facebook, Amazon, BookBub, Pinterest.

Q: What’s your biggest drawback to self-publishing – time or budget?

A: Budget. I’ll make time and find the money, creating a self-publishing budget to keep myself from ruin.

Think Long-Term

To define your writing goals, pick just one main goal:

** Earn a living from your writing

** Give the world the stories only you can tell

** Control every aspect of your books, from cover to marketing

The one most important to you will tell you a lot about yourself as a writer and help shape your publishing future.

Good Things About Self-Publishing

** More control over every aspect of publishing and marketing your books.

** Higher royalties on ebooks.

** Control over changing features for marketing purposes: page description, categories & keywords, price. You can even make minor changes in the book itself.

** Transparency on sales reporting: you can look at your sales hourly (not recommended for an author’s mental health, though).

Stay tuned for PART 3 — Amazon for Independent Authors

Buy THE INVISIBLES on Amazon or read on KU